Generations of Hope – Newsletter September 2016

Generations of Hope September News

June 2017 in Milwaukee – Global Intergenerational Conference Request for Proposed Papers

Generations United has announced the 2017 Global Intergenerational Conference will be in Milwaukee in the middle of June 2017 (https://guconference.org/about/). They have sent us the general request for presentations (several options-workshops, roundtables poster sessions) Generations United is an organization whose mission is- “to improve the lives of children, youth and older adults through intergenerational collaboration, public policies, and programs for the enduring benefit of all.” As an organization promoting intergenerational programs, they spend about 20% of their budget on lobbying, seek grants and hold conferences. They have become one of the “go to” organizations when the issue of intergenerational programming comes up and a spokesperson is needed. They were key in an award winning integenerational program at Kendal at Oberlin, one of the retirement communities operated by the Kendal corp. Kendal has been a leader in the continuous care retirement communities movement and may be the first to integrate a Generations of Hope inspired community with a university based retirement community.

Yes, let me know if you would like to make a joint presentation proposal. My desire would be a 3 or 4 member GOH inspired panel with each presenter describing the explosion in different types of Generations of Hope communities. With pyrotechnics, it could be the star of the show! (Proposals are due September 30, 2016)

Treehouse to build new community on the West Coast (and in New York)

Congratulations are in order! In an article in the Chronicle of Social Change, Treehouse Foundation announced that it has hooked up with Metpan and is planning a new foster/adoptive and aging out foster care youth community in the Santa Clara, California area. In the article, two new other sites are mentioned, expansion of Tree House in the West Boston area and a potential new site in Albany New York. We can only say Judy Cockerton’s plans are HUGE! But wait that is not P.C.!

Here is the first of many, “Where to find the resources” if you can’t find a “sugar daddy” and I haven’t won the lottery!

HUD’s Section 811 Supportive Housing for Persons with Disabilities Program is a critical program that assists the lowest income people with significant and long-term disabilities to live independently in the community by providing affordable housing linked with voluntary services and supports. The enactment of the Frank Melville Supportive Housing Investment Act of 2010 reformed Section 811, creating the opportunity to systematically develop new permanent supportive housing units integrated within affordable housing properties every year.

Importantly -( Of course, pretending there is no pending election)!!

The budget for 2017 for Melville stands at $154 million with both houses and the President agreeing on that level. (This is $3.4 million above 2015). In addition to covering renewals, this would fund $25 million for new Project Rental Assistance awards to state housing agencies to fund units that serve tenants with disabilities experiencing homelessness or at high risk of homelessness, as well as extremely low income tenants with disabilities transitioning out of institutions and tenants with disabilities at high risk of institutionalization. This will be about 800 new units available through state housing authorities.

How do I get funding?

The last big round of Melville funding on March 2, 2015 HUD released $150 million for 4,600 units in 24 states.(43 states applied) In all cases after the Notice of Funds Availability by HUD, local agencies and groups must work through their state Housing Authority and compete with other groups. As in many programs administered by the Housing Authorities, finding a consultant developer that knows the ropes and has experience in the specific program will yield results.

Recent Contacts and Questions about creating a new Generations of Hope sight

Note: There has been a new ripple of interest in intergenerational communities for aging out foster youth and the more traditional foster/adoptive communities. Some references are made to Leslie Stahl’s book, Ina Jaffe’s NPR programs on intergenerational communities. Several people have raised foster kids and are ready for a bigger challenge.

Special mention about Waterbury/Cheshire Connecticut and Elkhart, Indiana. Deb Kelleher head of the Annie Courtney Foundation is so interested in creating an Generations of Hope inspired community she has added a segment on the plan at the website. (http://www.anniec.org/intergenrational-housing-initiative/). I met with Matt Borst who is planning a “aging out” foster care a Hope community in the Elkhart area. He has been working with his legislatures, local mayor and is hoping that a partnership will develop with the local Continuous Care retirement community – Greencroft. (http://www.villagetovillageintl.com/)

Other Contact considering a new Hope community

  • Boise, Idaho foster/adoptive care
  • Ithaca, New York
  • Durham and Cary, North Carolina
  • Madison Heights, Virginia
  • Rockaway, New Jersey

President’s Notes

The human mind is often so awkward and ill-regulated in the career of invention, that it is at first diffident, and then despises itself. For it appears at first incredible that any such discover should be made, and when it has been made, it appears incredible that is should so long have escape men’s research. (Francis Bacon, Novem Organum, 1620)

My latest copy of the co-housing newsletter had a little bit on one of the early Danish components of the co-housing movement (yes its growing faster than our communities) In 1967 a Danish writer, Bodil Graae wrote an article entitled, Children Should Have One Hundred Parents. according to the Danes that was the beginning of the co-housing movement. I think that within five years we will have one or more co-housing intergenerational communities for a vulnerable population.

David Hopping has been helping me frame what might be someone’s dissertation/ethnographic research/evaluation of the young adults who over the years have been residents of Hope Meadows. The oldest will be in their late twenties. As we think they are mostly findable it will make an interesting review of where they are now. Funding will drive how far we can go.

In our next newsletter, I will report on the Community Land Trust (CLT) conference in Park City and how you can look at this option in developing affordable housing using CLT and/or CHT. I suspect that the other conference I will be attending, Communal Studies Association “Utopian” conference in Salt Lake where I am moderating a panel on Eschatology will not have as many nuggets of practical wisdom but the parallels (old vs. new) are always fascinating.

Other Contact considering a new Hope community

  • Boise, Idaho foster/adoptive care
  • Ithaca, New York
  • Akron, Ohio
  • Durham and Cary, North Carolina
  • Madison Heights, Virginia
  • Rockaway, New Jersey

President’s Notes

The human mind is often so awkward and ill-regulated in the career of invention, that it is at first diffident, and then despises itself. For it appears at first incredible that any such discover should be made, and when it has been made, it appears incredible that is should so long have escape men’s research. (Francis Bacon, Novem Organum, 1620)

My latest copy of the co-housing newsletter had a little bit on one of the early Danish components of the co-housing movement (yes its growing faster than our communities) In 1967 a Danish writer, Bodil Graae wrote an article entitled, Children Should Have One Hundred Parents. according to the Danes that was the beginning of the co-housing movement. I think that within five years we will have one or more co-housing intergenerational communities for a vulnerable population.

David Hopping has been helping me frame what might be someone’s dissertation/ethnographic research/evaluation of the young adults who over the years have been residents of Hope Meadows. The oldest will be in their late twenties. As we think they are mostly findable it will make an interesting review of where they are now. Funding will drive how far we can go.

In our next newsletter, I will report on the Community Land Trust (CLT) conference in Park City and how you can look at this option in developing affordable housing using CLT and/or CHT. I suspect that the other conference I will be attending, Communal Studies Association “Utopian” conference in Salt Lake where I am moderating a panel on Eschatology will not have as many nuggets of practical wisdom but the parallels (old vs. new) are always fascinating.

The budget for 2017 for Melville stands at $154 million with both houses and the President agreeing on that level. (This is $3.4 million above 2015). In addition to covering renewals, this would fund $25 million for new Project Rental Assistance awards to state housing agencies to fund units that serve tenants with disabilities experiencing homelessness or at high risk of homelessness, as well as extremely low income tenants with disabilities transitioning out of institutions and tenants with disabilities at high risk of institutionalization. This will be about 800 new units available through state housing authorities.

How do I get funding?

The last big round of Melville funding on March 2, 2015 HUD released $150 million for 4,600 units in 24 states.(43 states applied) In all cases after the Notice of Funds Availability by HUD, local agencies and groups must work through their state Housing Authority and compete with other groups. As in many programs administered by the Housing Authorities, finding a consultant developer that knows the ropes and has experience in the specific program will yield results.

Recent Contacts and Questions about creating a new Generations of Hope sight

Note: There has been a new ripple of interest in intergenerational communities for aging out foster youth and the more traditional foster/adoptive communities. Some references are made to Leslie Stahl’s book, Ina Jaffe’s NPR programs on intergenerational communities. Several people have raised foster kids and are ready for a bigger challenge.

Special mention about Waterbury/Cheshire Connecticut and Elkhart, Indiana. Deb Kelleher head of the Annie Courtney Foundation is so interested in creating an Generations of Hope inspired community she has added a segment on the plan at the website. (http://www.anniec.org/intergenrational-housing-initiative/). I met with Matt Borst who is planning a “aging out” foster care a Hope community in the Elkhart area. He has been working with his legislatures, local mayor and is hoping that a partnership will develop with the local Continuous Care retirement community – Greencroft. (http://www.villagetovillageintl.com/)

Other Contact considering a new Hope community

  • Boise, Idaho foster/adoptive care
  • Ithaca, New York
  • Akron, Ohio
  • Durham and Cary, North Carolina
  • Madison Heights, Virginia
  • Rockaway, New Jersey

President’s Notes

The human mind is often so awkward and ill-regulated in the career of invention, that it is at first diffident, and then despises itself. For it appears at first incredible that any such discover should be made, and when it has been made, it appears incredible that is should so long have escape men’s research. (Francis Bacon, Novem Organum, 1620)

My latest copy of the co-housing newsletter had a little bit on one of the early Danish components of the co-housing movement (yes its growing faster than our communities) In 1967 a Danish writer, Bodil Graae wrote an article entitled, Children Should Have One Hundred Parents. according to the Danes that was the beginning of the co-housing movement. I think that within five years we will have one or more co-housing intergenerational communities for a vulnerable population.

David Hopping has been helping me frame what might be someone’s dissertation/ethnographic research/evaluation of the young adults who over the years have been residents of Hope Meadows. The oldest will be in their late twenties. As we think they are mostly findable it will make an interesting review of where they are now. Funding will drive how far we can go.

In our next newsletter, I will report on the Community Land Trust (CLT) conference in Park City and how you can look at this option in developing affordable housing using CLT and/or CHT. I suspect that the other conference I will be attending, Communal Studies Association “Utopian” conference in Salt Lake where I am moderating a panel on Eschatology will not have as many nuggets of practical wisdom but the parallels (old vs. new) are always fascinating.

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